Wednesday, July 30, 2014

The Square Cat: 55 Today

Today marks the 55th anniversary of the world premiere of Alan Ayckbourn's first professionally produced play The Square Cat.
To mark the anniversary, the blog presents an extract from the book Unseen Ayckbourn, by Alan Ayckbourn's archivist Simon Murgatroyd, looking at the story behind the play.

The Square Cat

The Square Cat was Alan Ayckbourn’s first professional play, commissioned by his mentor Stephen Joseph and premiered at the Library Theatre, Scarborough, on 30 July 1959.
The genesis of the play has often been repeated in interviews over the years, but what should not be forgotten is Alan never had any grand intentions to be a playwright; at the time of his first commission he was just an actor at the Library Theatre, Scarborough.

“I have never made any decisions; they have always been made for me. I could look back on my life and say I planned it that way, but I didn't plan to be an actor, nor a director, nor a writer. They ran out of writers!”

Alan Ayckbourn as Jerry Wattis &
Arthur Brummage in The Square Cat.
Copyright: Alan Ayckbourn
Even if he did nit intend to be a playwright, Alan had actually been interested in writing for many years and had written a number of scripts - mostly inspired by his favourite writers - which he was confident enough to submit to Stephen Joseph, the founder of the Library Theatre, for advice. This knowledge of Alan’s nascent talent and enthusiasm for writing gave Stephen the perfect opportunity to further encourage the young writer when Alan infamously complained about the roles he had been playing recently.

“Stephen had the complete, some would say lunatic, disregard in allowing me to write for him. The story goes that I came off stage one night and said that I could write much better than what I had just acted in and he told me to get on with it then."

The offending play was David Campton’s Ring Of Roses, although for many years Alan mentioned it was John Van Druten’s Bell, Book And Candle, as he did not want to upset Campton, a friend and contemporary at the Library Theatre.
Stephen Joseph was always keen to encourage new writers, although this also had other benefits for the company as Alan recalls there was funding to encourage new writing.

“The Arts Council gave us £300, more than I’d ever seen in one place before. I thought, this is money for old rope.”

Stephen’s writing challenge was made during the winter season at the Library Theatre in 1958, when Alan was also in rehearsals for the company’s brief winter tour. The play he was rehearsing was by and being directed by a relatively unknown writer who had just suffered his first West End flop. Harold Pinter had been invited to Scarborough to direct The Birthday Party following its critical mauling in London. This would only be the second time it had been professionally staged and featured Alan in the role of Stanley. The play may not have directly influenced The Square Cat, but its author certainly inspired Alan.

“I got fascinated by his [Pinter’s] use of dialogue, his use of words, the structure of sentences. You can see even now what’s actually rubbed off on me from him.”

The Square Cat was written during the tour, but it was not a sole effort. Alan’s partner and soon to be wife, Christine Roland, worked together with him offering advice on the play.

“I stomped off home and, with the help of my then wife, who was a very judicious editor, wrote a play under a joint pseudonym, Roland Allen. This was the time of skiffle and coffee bars and the play was an unashamed launch for my own acting career.”

The pseudonym Roland Allen (Christine Roland / Alan Ayckbourn) was used by Alan for his first four plays, although Christine was only involved in helping The Square Cat and Love After All.
The Square Cat was a showcase for him both as a playwright and actor with Alan playing two roles; it has never really been emphasised Alan spent the play quick-changing between the rock ‘n’ roll star Jerry Wattis and the mild-mannered Arthur Brummage.

“I came on in act one and stayed on, with all the best lines, until the end, and I danced and sang and played the guitar - none of which I was very good at. It was an immensely practical way to start. I learned a great deal from seeing the same bits die every night."

It opened at the Library Theatre, Scarborough, on 30 July 1959 and was a big hit with the summer audiences. The surprise success and demand for tickets led Stephen Joseph to cancel a week’s performance of David Campton’s adaptation of Frankenstein (which had not been well received) and scheduled a second week for The Square Cat’s second repertory run the following month; the first time a play in repertory had run for two consecutive weeks at the venue.
For Alan, the over-riding memory was the pay-cheque.

“It made me forty-seven quid, I remember, more than I earned in several weeks. It proved very popular because it was what it was - a farce, with no pretensions to anything else - and it did give people quite a laugh.”

Financial accounts for the 1959 season record that 3,440 people saw the play during its three weeks of performance and it made £695 with a number of the performances booked to capacity; in comparison the most successful show of the season was John Van Druten's Bell, Book & Candle which was seen by nine more people and took an equivalent amount of money.
Conventional wisdom has it The Square Cat was never performed again, but it was produced once more during the company’s 1959 winter tour. Alan was unavailable to reprise his role, having received his National Service call-up (deftly avoided by being signed out after just three days) and Barry Boys took on the role for the play’s swansong.
It has never been performed since then and the script has never been published. Although Alan suggested for many years all copies had been destroyed, it is surprisingly profligate. Originals of the play are held by The University Of York, The University Of Manchester and the British Library.
The only other public glimpses of The Square Cat have been in 2005 when on the anniversary of the Stephen Joseph Theatre’s 50th anniversary, Alan agreed to let the first scene of the play be read as part of the theatre’s celebration event 50 Years New. He also agreed to a reading of this scene as part of the Royal And Derngate Theatre’s Ayckbourn At 70 celebration in 2009 and for an Ayckbourn themed weekend in Scarborough in 2010.

“We read The Square Cat [at 50 Years New] and I would say to anyone that heard it: “Take heart, if you are writing plays it can only get better than this.” They [the early plays] are not producible pieces, they are nothing more than my early jottings. My early plays are an object lesson in someone having confidence in someone - I was just delighted that someone would put my plays on.”

Unseen Ayckbourn is available from amazon.co.uk here and amazon.com here. You can find out more about the book by clicking here.

Copyright: Simon Murgatroyd. Please do not reproduce without permission of the copyright holder.

Monday, July 28, 2014

This Week: 28 July 2014

Welcome to This Week, our regular guide to major Ayckbourn productions in the coming seven days, a look back on the Ayckbourn news of the last seven days and a look at some significant Ayckbourn anniversaries from this week in years past.

This Week & Coming soon:
Until 27 August: A Small Family Business at the National Theatre
Until 31 August: The Boy Who Fell Into A Book at the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough, directed by Alan Ayckbourn.
7 - 9 August: The Norman Conquests at the Theatro Technis, Camden, London

News Round Up:
> This week marks the 55th anniversary of the opening of Alan Ayckbourn's first full-length play The Square Cat and the 45th anniversary of his classic play How The Other Half Loves. Both opened at the Library Theatre, Scarborough, in 1959 and 1969 respectively.
> The new musical adaptation of Alan Ayckbourn's play The Boy Who Fell Into A Book is now running at the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough, with the official opening tomorrow night. Visit www.sjt.uk.com for further details.
Celebrating Ayckbourn at the Samuel French website continues its exploration of Alan Ayckbourn's plays this week.

Anniversaries:
30 July: World premiere of Alan Ayckbourn's first play The Square Cat at the Library Theatre, Scarborough, in 1959.
30 July: World premiere of Alan Ayckbourn's Henceforward... at the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough, in 1987.
31 July: World premiere of Alan Ayckbourn's first play How The Other Half Loves at the Library Theatre, Scarborough, in 1969.
1 August: London premiere of A Chorus Of Disapproval at the National Theatre in 1985.

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

The Boy Who Fell Into A Book

The new musical adaptation of Alan Ayckbourn's play The Boy Who Fell Into A Book is now running at the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough.
Evelyn Hoskins as Kevin, the boy who falls into a book
Copyright: Tony Bartholomew
Directed by Alan Ayckbourn, the musical has been adapted by Paul James with music by Cathy Shostak and Eric Angus and is the first of Alan's plays to have been adapted into a musical.
For Alan Ayckbourn, it has been a new experience directing an adaptation of his own work, but he feels that Paul, Cathy and Eric have created something he has enjoyed working on.
"They’ve caught the spirit of the play very closely and they obviously love it because otherwise you can’t work on something you don’t like. I think they’re as passionate about it as I was when I first wrote the play. As a director, I’ll hitch onto that!"
Katie Birtill as Monique
Copyright: Tony Bartholomew
The play features Evelyn Hoskins as Kevin with Nicolas Colicos as the pulp detective Rockfist Slim alongside Katie Birtill, Natasha J Barnes, John Barr and Stephen Matthews.
It follows Kevin's adventures after he falls into the pages of Rockfist Slim's latest adventure, leading the pair into an unlikely friendship as they try to find the way back to Kevin's bedroom through the books on his book-shelf whilst avoiding the evil machinations of Rockfist's nemesis The Green Shark.
Delighted with the adaptation, Alan believes this is a show which will appeal to all ages - or anyone who enjoyed reading a book! - and will appeal to the entire family.
"I think The Boy Who Fell Into A Book lends itself to a musical because it has this fantasy element to it and it is a family show - it’s not a children’s show, definitely a family show - and it’s a play for anyone who was a child and anyone who read under the bedclothes under a child and anyone who’s ever been activated by am story or a book. It’s a neat show but with huge potential."
The production has musical direction by Michael Warman with design by Michael Holt, lighting by Jason Taylor, choreography by Sheila Carter with the band consisting of Chris Guard, Timothy Dullaway and Anthony Lawton.
The Boy Who Fell In A Book can be seen at the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough, until 31 August. Tickets are priced from £10 to £24.50 with family tickets also available and can be booked at www.sjt.uk.com where further details about the production can also be found.
A look at the history of The Boy Who Fell Into A Book (and an entire section on the play) can be found at Alan Ayckbourn's Official Website by clicking here.
Evelyn Hoskins, John Barr & Nicolas Colicos
Copyright: Tony Bartholomew
Stephen Matthews & Nicolas Colicos
Copyright: Tony Bartholomew

Monday, July 21, 2014

This Week: 21 July 2014

Welcome to This Week, our regular guide to major Ayckbourn productions in the coming seven days, a look back on the Ayckbourn news of the last seven days and a look at some significant Ayckbourn anniversaries from this week in years past.

This Week & Coming soon:
Until 27 August: A Small Family Business at the National Theatre
Until 31 August: The Boy Who Fell Into A Book at the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough, directed by Alan Ayckbourn.

News Round Up:
> The new musical adaptation of Alan Ayckbourn's play The Boy Who Fell Into A Book is now running at the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough, with the official opening tomorrow night. Visit www.sjt.uk.com for further details.
> Salisbury Playhouse will be presenting Alan Ayckbourn's Bedroom Farce from 4 September to 4 October, click here for details.
Celebrating Ayckbourn at the Samuel French website continues its exploration of Alan Ayckbourn's plays this week.

Anniversaries:
22 July: World premiere of Alan Ayckbourn's Life & Beth at the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough, in 2008.
23 July: World premiere of Alan Ayckbourn's Sugar Daddies  at the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough, in 2003.